Paul Durbin | U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

Investigator:

Paul Durbin

Sponsor:

Department of Defense
U.S. Naval Research Laboratory

Award Title: 

Advancing Predictive Strategies for Wall-Bounded Turbulence by Fundamental Studies and Data-driven Modeling

Award Amount:

$1 Million

Award Period Date:

February 1, 2016 – January 31, 2021

 

Status:

Ongoing

Summary:

Iowa State University aerospace engineering professor Paul Durbin will lead a $1,000,000 grant from the Department of Defense – U.S. Naval Research Laboratory to study wall-bounded turbulence.

As Navy ships cruise through the water at 40 knots, even small objects along the hull such as barnacles, sand, and rivets can create turbulence that will affect the transport properties.

Dr. Paul Durbin, professor of aerospace engineering at Iowa State University, received a $1 million grant from the Department of Defense – US Naval Research Laboratory to study wall-bounded turbulence by fundamental studies and data-driven modeling.

Read more here.

Peng Wei and Kristin Y. Rozier | NSF

Investigator:

Peng Wei (Principal Investigator)
Kristin Y. Rozier, Thomas Schnell, Ella Atkins, George Hunter (Co-Principal Investigators)

Sponsor:

NSF

Award Title: 

Pre-Departure Dynamic Geofencing, En-Route Traffic Alerting, Emergency Landing and Contingency Management for Intelligent Low-Altitude Airspace UAS Traffic Management

Award Amount:

$1 Million

Award Period Date:

August 15, 2017 – July 31, 2020

 

Status:

Ongoing

Summary:

Iowa State University aerospace engineering assistant professors Peng Wei and Kristin Yvonne Rozier will lead a $1,000,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, creating a system to manage and monitor low-altitude air traffic.

Around the campus of Iowa State University, the sky can be bustling with helicopters, crop dusters, recreation planes, and personal unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). As technology improves, the sky is likely to get even more crowded. The increased traffic can present problems for pilots as well as people on the ground down below.

“In the United States, low-altitude is pretty busy compared with other countries,” said Peng Wei, an Iowa State assistant professor of aerospace engineering and principal investigator of a National Science Foundation grant. “We need to make sure we have a system to monitor this kind of traffic in both local airspace and also nation-wide so that we can have safe and efficient operations.”

Wei, along with Iowa State assistant professor Kristin Yvonne Rozier, University of Iowa professor Thomas Schnell, University of Michigan professor Ella Atkins, and George Hunter, principal data scientist at Mosaic ATM will create a way for the Federal Aviation Administration to maintain safe skies as they get more crowded. The team is specifically concerned with low-altitude, which the FAA defines as below 400 ft. above ground level.

Read more here.

Christina Bloebaum | NSF INFEWS

Investigator:

Christina Bloebaum (Principal Investigator)
James Oliver, J.W. Clark Wolf, Ali Abbas, Amy Kaleita
(Co-Principal Investigators)

Sponsor:

NSF – INFEWS

Award Title: 

Cyber-Based Decision Support Strategies to Achieve Consensus for FEW System Sustainability using Incentive and Policy Structures

Award Amount:

$2.4 Million Continuous

Award Period Date:

October 1, 2017 – September 30, 2022

 

Status:

Ongoing

Summary:

Iowa State University researchers have received a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to analyze food, energy and water (FEW) interdependencies and create a simulator that will assist in better decision making with FEW systems.

Led by Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Interim Department Chair, Christina Bloebaum, researchers will examine how decisions made by individual stakeholders within the FEW system can have an impact on everything else in the system. Further, the team will investigate how incentive and policy structures can be developed to achieve balance across stakeholders to avoid unintended consequences.

Read more here.

Hui Hu | Dupont

Investigator:

Hui Hu

Sponsor:

Dupont

Award Title: 

Testing of Dupont’s Anti-Icing Solution For Wind Turbine Icing Mitigation

Award Amount:

$20,749

Award Period Date:

June 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018

 

Status:

Ongoing

Leifur Leifsson | CNDE

Investigator:

Leifur Leifsson, Robert Grandin, Ron Roberts, Jiming Song, William Meeker

Sponsor:

CNDE/ISU-IU

Award Title: 

Efficient Multi-Parameter Model-Assisted Probability of Detection Using Physics-Based Simulations and Stochastic Surrogates

Award Amount:

$180,000

Award Period Date:

May 16, 2017 – May 15, 2020

 

Status:

Ongoing

Summary:

The objective of the proposed work is to advance the state-of-the-art in model-assisted probability of detection (MAPOD) through use of fast stochastic surrogate models for physics-based measurement simulations. The practice of determining the probability of defect detection for a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) inspection through use of computational measurement simulation is recognized for its potential cost savings and improved accuracy. However, measurement simulation covering the full range of possible input parameters most often represents a prohibitively large computational task, particularly when using rigorous high-accuracy numerical simulation of the measurement physics. The proposed work will develop and demonstrate fast surrogate model use in MAPOD determination using representative ultrasound and eddy current NDE measurement configurations.

Ganesh Rajagopalan | Georgia Institute of Technology

Investigator:

Ganesh Rajagopalan

Sponsor:

Georgia Institute of Technology

Award Title: 

Fluid Dynamics of Counter-Rotating, Lift Offset Rotor Interactions and Multirotor Aerodynamic Interactions Over A Wide Range of Reynolds Number

Award Amount:

$375,000

Award Period Date:

October 1, 2016 – September 30, 2021

 

Status:

Ongoing

Valery Levitas | DOD-Army Research Office

Investigator:

Valery Levitas

Sponsor:

DOD-Army Research Office

Award Title: 

High Pressure and Large Shear Deformation System for Materials Research

Award Amount:

$144,294

Award Period Date:

July 15, 2017 – July 14, 2018

 

Status:

Ongoing

Valery Levitas | DOD-Army Research Laboratory

Investigator:

Valery Levitas

Sponsor:

DOD-Army Research Laboratory

Award Title: 

Phase transformation-related phenomena under compression and shear of ceramics

Award Amount:

$450,000

Award Period Date:

November 1, 2016 – October 31, 2019

 

Status:

Ongoing

Kristin Yvonne Rozier | NSF

Investigator:

Kristin Yvonne Rozier

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Award Title: 

CAREER: Theoretical Foundations of the UAS in the NAS Problem (Unmanned Aerial Systems in the National Air Space)

Award Amount:

$105,054

Award Period Date:

February 15, 2016 – November 30, 2016

 

Status:

Completed

Summary:

Due to their increasing use by civil and federal authorities and vast commercial and amateur applications, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) will be introduced into the National Air Space (NAS); the question is only how this can be done safely. Today, NASA and the FAA are designing a new, (NextGen) automated air traffic control system for all aircraft, manned or unmanned. New algorithms and tools will need to be developed to enable computation of the complex questions inherent in designing such a system while proving adherence to rigorous safety standards. Researchers must develop the tools of formal analysis to be able to address the UAS in the NAS problem, reason about UAS integration during the design phase of NextGen, and tie this design to on-board capabilities to provide runtime System Health Management (SHM), ensuring the safety of people and property on the ground. Read more.

Kristin Yvonne Rozier | NASA

Investigator:

Kristin Yvonne Rozier

Sponsor:

NASA

Award Title: 

Multi-Platform, Multi-Architecture Runtime Verification of Autonomous Space Systems

Award Amount:

$600,000

Award Period Date:

2016-2019

 

Status:

Active

Summary:

Autonomous systems are only capable of effective self-governing if they can reliably sense their own faults and respond to failures and uncertain environmental conditions. We propose to design a real-time, onboard runtime verification and system health management (SHM) framework called R2U2, to continuously monitor essential system components such as sensors, software, and hardware for detection and diagnosis of failures and violations of safety or performance rules during the mission of autonomous space systems, such as rovers, small satellites, or Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) flying in the skies of other planets. Read more about the research on NASA’s website.