Anupam Sharma | Argonne National Laboratory

sharma_argonne-grant

Investigator:

Anupam Sharma

Sponsor:

Argonne National Laboratory

Award Title: 

Unraveling Silent Owl Flight to Develop Ultra-­Quiet Energy Conversion Machines

Year:

2016

Summary:

Acoustic  emission  (noise)  from  wind  turbines  is  curtailing  the  growth  of  wind  energy,  which  is  currently  the  primary  renewable  energy  source  in  the  US  and  in  the  world.  A majority of the noise radiated from wind turbines is generated aerodynamically – due to interaction of wind with blade surfaces. Aerodynamic sound (aeroacoustics) is an issue not just  for  wind  turbines  but  also  for  aircraft,  jet  engines,  combustion  turbines  used  for  electricity generation, cooling fans, and ventilation systems.

A solution to the problem of aerodynamic noise generation is available in nature but has not yet been leveraged to develop silent machines. The nocturnal owl is known to have a silent  flight  both  when  gliding  and  flapping.  This  has  been  known  for  decades,  but  the  physical  mechanisms  enabling  its  silent  flight  are  not  well  understood.  Previous investigations  have  identified  three  feather  features  that  are  unique  to  the  owl.  Experimental  investigations  have  demonstrated  that  these  unique  feather  features  are responsible for the owl’s acoustic stealth.  However, these experiments alone are unable to identify  the  reasons/mechanisms  behind  noise  reduction.

This project supports very high resolution simulations to bridge the scientific gap between experimental results and theoretical understanding. A systematic numerical investigation of  the  unique  owl  feather  features  is  proposed  to  answer  key  questions  that  will  help  unravel  the  mystery  behind  owl’s  silent  flight.  The  extremely  high  spatial  and  temporal resolution offered by high-­fidelity numerical simulations will enable source diagnostics to identify  how  the  unique  feather  features  curb  noise  generation.  The  knowledge  and  understanding  gained  from  these  simulations  can  empower  us  to  design  nearly  silent energy conversion-­‐ and various other engineering machines.

Read more

 

Christina Bloebaum | National Science Foundation

Christina Bloebaum Grand Header_NSF

Investigator:

Christina Bloebaum

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Award Title: 

EAGER: Collaborative Research: Lectures for Foundations in Systems Engineering

Award Amount:

$150,000

Award Period Date: 

August 1, 2016-July 31, 2018

Current Status: 

Active

Summary:

The objective of the Early-concept Grant for Exploratory Research (EAGER) collaborative project is to create a series of educational videos on foundational areas from which systems engineering theory will be able to draw. Dr. Bloebaum, along with Dr. Abbas from the University of Southern California, will promote the use of rigorous foundations in the development of a theory of systems engineering in ways that are accessible to a broad group of educators, researchers and practitioners.

For more information on the award, please visit the NSF website.

Peng Wei | NSF

Peng Wei Grant Header_NSF

Investigator:

Peng Wei

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Award Title: 

CRII: CPS: Towards an Intelligent Low-Altitude UAS Traffic Management System

Award Amount:

$1,000,000

Award Period Date: 

May 15, 2016-April 30, 2018

Current Status: 

Active

 

Summary:

The objective of this project is to provide theoretical foundations for cyber-physical systems to support the increasing autonomy in the presence of other manned/unmanned air traffic. Currently the United States air transportation is facing significant challenges due to the rapid evolution of increasingly autonomous systems such as unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and their expanding presence. However, there has been little scientific investigation on the cyber-physical systems that supports unmanned aircraft operations operating in the presence of other air vehicles. This research project explores novel strategies of coordinating and managing the UAS traffic to ensure low-altitude airspace safety and efficiency in near future. 

Read more about the award on the NSF website.

Wei Hong | Partners of the Americas

Wei Hong_Grant Header

Investigator:

Wei Hong

Sponsor:

Partners of the Americas

Award Title: 

Self-Sustainable Study Abroad Programs at Xi’an Jiaotong University for U.S. Engineering Students

Award Amount:

$49,977

Award Period Date: 

July 1, 2016-August 31, 2017

Current Status: 

Active

Summary:

This is a newly developed semester-long exchange program between ISU and Xi’an Jiaotong University in Xi’an, China. Each year, equal number of American and Chinese students will spend one semester in the host universities, taking courses just like regular students. The first group of ISU students will depart in January 2017. Xi’an Jiaotong will offer Engineering courses in English, in addition to a variety of Chinese language/culture courses. No prior knowledge of Chinese language/culture is needed to enter the program.  The students will be able to keep up with the regular study plan after the semester, in addition to the unique study-abroad experience and some foreign language proficiency.

 

Thomas Ward | ACS Petroleum Research Fund

Thomas Ward_Grant Header

Investigator:

Thomas Ward

Sponsor:

American Chemical Society Petroleum Research Fund

Award Title: 

A computational study of micro-emulsion formation in a porous media

Award Amount:

$110,000

Award Period Date: 

June 9, 2016-June 9, 2018

Current Status: 

Active

Summary:

 The proposed work involves a mostly computational study of micro-emulsion formation in porous media. The problem is relevant to chemically enhanced oil recovery where it is necessary to improve sweep efficiency in order to reduce water usage. The problem to be modelled in the miscible displacement of a viscous liquid in a channel and a tube. For chemical enhanced oil recovery the micro-rheological behavior of a micro-emulsion that forms spontaneously at the interface separating two nearly miscible liquids will be considered. The goal is to develop a firm understanding of these type of displacements which are relevant to the efficient removal of oil from porous media along with other natural and engineered systems. The project will produce numerical data for sweep efficiency based on theoretical models for momentum and mass transport while including the effects micro-rheology formation at the fluid-fluid interface. Experiments associated with the project will consist mostly of viscosity measurements. A few proof of concept experiments will be performed to compare with the theory.

Dayal & Holland | INNOVEYDA

Dayal and Holland

Investigator:

Vinay Dayal & Stephen Holland 

Sponsor:

INNOVEYDA

Award Title: 

Composite Standard Calibration Kit for Interchangeable Use in NDE Systems

Award Amount:

$148,087

Award Period Date: 

October 1, 2015-September 30, 2016

Current Status: 

Active

 

Sarkar & Sharma | NSF

Sarkar & Sharma_edit

Investigator:

Partha Sarkar and Anupam Sharma

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Award Title: 

Predicting Dynamic Response of Structural Cables and Power Transmission Lines in Hurricanes and Other Windstorms

Award Amount:

$337,831

Summary:

The primary goal of this proposed research is to improve the resilience of cables to all types of windstorm hazards

 

Paul Durbin | University of Michigan

Paul Durbin_Grant Header

Investigator:

Paul Durbin

Sponsor:

University of Michigan

Award Title: 

Methods and Tools for Data-Driven Turbulence Modeling

Award Amount:

$160,000

Summary:

Participate in data extraction by optimization: identify data sets, provide models to use for transition, heat transfer, Reynolds stress.

 

Levitas & Xiong | NSF

Levitas Xiong

Investigator:

Valery Levitas and Liming Xiong 

Sponsor:

National Science Foundation

Award Title: 

Interactions of Multiple Phase Transformations and Dislocations:
Modeling and Simulation from Atomistic to Microscal

Award Amount:

$405,001

Award Period Date: 

September 1, 2015-August 31, 2018

Current Status: 

Active

Summary:

The goal of this project is to develop a multiscale framework for modeling the coupled dynamics of PTs and dislocations in single and polycrystalline materials from atomic to macroscopic level, to apply this approach to solve fundamental problems related to the interaction of PTs and plasticity at different scales, to reveal the main mechanisms and phenomena, and find methods of controlling them